Thesis

Eudaimonic well-being of entrepreneurs: A systematic literature review

Key Info

Basic Information

Group:
Lehrstuhl für Wirtschaftswissenschaften für Ingenieure und Naturwissenschaftler
Level:
Bachelor

Supervisor

Poor mental health is estimated to cost the global economy US$ 6 trillion by 2030. Not only since the COVID-19 pandemic, well-being is receiving increasing attention in policy making, the workplace and social media, e.g. in the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Not even entrepreneurs are immune: 8% of start-up failures are (partially) due to burnout. Therefore, academia is highly interested in understanding the mechanisms of entrepreneurial well-being. Especially eudaimonic well-being has become more and more researched in the past few years as it became evident that not only positive affect and satisfaction determine a person’s well-being, but also how fulfilled they feel and how much purpose they see in their lives.
With this bachelor thesis, we would like to systematically review this recent research on eudaimonic well-being with three goals: Generate a clear picture of the ways used to measure eudaimonic well-being, determine the antecedents and outcomes researched so far and develop an agenda for future research.

What is expected from you?
- Ability to work independently
- High readiness to read

What's in it for you?
- Insight into a research topic with high actual relevance
- Personal support and coaching from a researcher with a consulting background and a focus on entrepreneurial well-being
- Thesis in German or English (preferred)

Introductory Literature:
- Stephan, U. (2018). Entrepreneurs’ mental health and well-being: A review and research agenda. Academy of Management Perspectives, 32(3), 290-322.
- Wiklund, J., Nikolaev, B., Shir, N., Foo, M. D., & Bradley, S. (2019). Entrepreneurship and well-being: Past, present, and future. Journal of business venturing, 34(4), 579-588.
- Ryff, C. D. (2019). Entrepreneurship and eudaimonic well-being: Five venues for new science. Journal of business venturing, 34(4), 646-663.

Keywords: Well-being, entrepreneurship